Relieving Letter

What is a Relieving Letter?

A Relieving Letter is a letter issued by an employer to an employee, stating the employee's last day of work. The letter also typically summarizes the employee's employment history with the company.

What do you put in a Relieving Letter?

A relieving letter is an important document to have in case of any emergencies or unexpected departures of an employee. The letter should include the employee's name, position, and the date the employee left the company. The letter should also list the company's contact information, and the employee's contact information.

What sort of employee needs a Relieving Letter?

There can be many reasons why an employee might need a relieving letter. Perhaps they are moving to a new city and have found a new job, or they have been given a new position within their company. In either case, they need to provide their current employer with a letter stating that they are leaving and the date that their last day of work will be. This letter can also be used to provide information about the employee's new position, such as the start date and contact information.

What sort of employer needs to write a Relieving Letter?

A relieving letter is a formal letter written by an employer to a departing employee, typically to confirm the employee's last day of work, the reason for leaving, and any outstanding final payments or monies owed.

In order to write a relieving letter, the employer must have an accurate record of the employee's last day of work. The letter should also state the reason for the departure, whether it is voluntary or involuntary. Finally, the letter should confirm any outstanding final payments or monies owed to the employee.

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